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A Deceit of Lapwing – The Seven Whistlers

Lapwing by R B Talbot Kelly

Originally posted 2018-04-14 12:19:12.


Suddenly! Some chance movement has been noticed by the nearest Lapwing, and away they go at once as if with the same wings, sweeping overhead, then to the right, then to the left, and then back again, a ‘flickering chequerboard’. Wee-ah-wee! The notes immediately repeated by another - Wee-ah-wee! Finally they settle again ...

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Songs from the Wood – Spring

A Spring Wood Near Midhurst - by S R Badmin RWS RE AIA FSIA (1906-1989)

Originally posted 2018-04-27 06:50:12.


A pale cerulean-blue sky – crisscrossed with misty white vapour trails of planes - a modern art canvas; paint casually, thrown from the artists brush; white clouds tinged salmon-pink hanging over the blue-grey mountains; just before sunrise – white wreaths of mist lingering over the fields and valley wood mirroring the vapour trails above. A lone Buzzard calls ...

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A Song for May

The Hawthorn (or May Tree) by Margaret W. Tarrant (1888-1959)

Originally posted 2018-05-06 05:20:59.

A Song for May - This post is a mashup of anecdote, memoir, and selected prose from Richard Jefferies and W H Hudson, illustrated with seasonal atmospheric soundscapes. Join me for a day, if you will in a celebration of nature’s symphony ...

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Signs of Spring

Originally posted 2018-03-13 17:40:18.

SIGNS OF SPRING
Rebecca Welshman

Jefferies’ field notebooks are full of references to the passing seasons. Each year he carefully noted the first signs of spring and summer and found happiness in the visible tokens of the seasons as they returned.  As he wrote in The Open Air “I knew the very dates of them all—the reddening elm, the arum, the hawthorn leaf, the celandine, the may; the yellow iris of the waters, the heath of the hillside. The time of the nightingale—the place to hear the first note.”

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