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An Ode to the Countryside

Where have all the Skylark gone?
Long time passing
Where have all the Skylark gone?
Long time ago
Where have all the Skylark gone?
Gone to ‘Lark Rise’ every one
When will we ever learn?
When will we ever learn?

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A Moment in Time

In a break with what this blog is all about and because it’s fast coming up to Christmas I am sharing some of the love and joy our daughter Bea brings us everyday with her singing.

A few years ago for her 18th birthday we got her into the studio to record some of her favourite songs of the moment. The result was a one-off CD.

It was a special moment in time, one which we will treasure forever. We never came up with a name for the CD and have never had it published. But it is a treasured keepsake.

A follower of my blog - Lavinia Ross - some 15 years or so ago made her own special keepsake CD (Keepsake) and listening to this again made me think it was time to give my daughter’s CD a name and the credit she deserves. So even though it’s maybe a bit cliche we’ve called it ‘A Moment in Time’.

So as a thank you to our lovely daughter and a way of thanking my readers here is a little joy to share this Christmas.

A Moment in Time
(A Keepsake Album of Covers by Bea)

Click on the ‘cloud’ download link to the right of the track-listing of ‘A Moment in Time’ to play each individual track.

Credits

All the songs were sung by Beatrix (Bea) Bennett with backing tracks licensed from Karaoke Version

The CD was produced and engineered by Russ Hayes at Orange Sound Recording Studio, Penmaenmawr, Conwy, North Wales.

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Artists Inspired by Nature – Rowland Hilder

The Downs - Rowland Hilder

Originally posted 2018-11-11 20:49:50.

Here, for all who know the Downs – their wandering pathways through fields of yellow and green, blue yet often lowering skies, are the Downs on an English summer’s afternoon. Rowland Hilder - The Downs. 

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Songs from the Wood – Spring

A Spring Wood Near Midhurst - by S R Badmin RWS RE AIA FSIA (1906-1989)

Originally posted 2018-04-27 06:50:12.


A pale cerulean-blue sky – crisscrossed with misty white vapour trails of planes - a modern art canvas; paint casually, thrown from the artists brush; white clouds tinged salmon-pink hanging over the blue-grey mountains; just before sunrise – white wreaths of mist lingering over the fields and valley wood mirroring the vapour trails above. A lone Buzzard calls ...

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Under the Snow – of Winter

Winter Wildfowl by Maurice Wilson in collaboration with Rowland Hilder

Originally posted 2018-04-13 05:59:13.


Carefully parting Willow, Bramble and bronzed Bracken fronds that rustled and crackled in the winter frost I could see my secret lake ... well large pond really - an old disused Flight Pond ... a few Mallard quacked and splashed noisily; a couple of Tufted Duck circled warily in the middle while on the far bank a pair of Teal rested, blending well with the pondside rushes ... a Coot called from somewhere in the reeds - well hidden - shatteringly loud ...

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Birds in Music

Music for a Summer Night

Originally posted 2018-05-15 06:06:01.

For many musicians and composers birdsong is the ultimate musical composition - yet is it music: Birds use variations of rhythm, relationships of musical pitch, and combinations of notes that resembles music, but without fixed musical intervals, as on a scale, there is a chaotic randomness to their singing.
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In Search of Yellowhammer, Corn and Cirl Bunting

Field and Open Countryside Birds (Yellowhammer, Corn Bunting and Cirl Bunting)

Originally posted 2018-04-27 19:37:37.

One early autumn evening, I was standing out of doors when the sun came out beneath a bank of dark cloud and lit up the weathered, soft blue-grey slate roof of our old barn. No sooner had the light fallen on it than a few Yellowhammer dropped down out of nowhere and sat motionless on the sun-warmed slates, with heads drawn in and plumage bunched out. It was as if the sun had poured a golden-coloured light into their loose feathers making them shine a bright canary yellow ...
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Murder, Mischief and Murmurations – Magpie, Raven and Starling

Raven by A W Seaby

Originally posted 2018-04-14 23:36:36.

I paused for a moment to look out over the marshy fields - a dull flat grey-green in the late autumn evening; almost night. The sun had set and white trails of mist followed the course of the river. A few Magpie were chakking noisily in some willow scrub. Starkly black and white. I counted - one for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl, four a boy - a few more flew in - eight for a wish, nine for a kiss ... and then more - twenty, thirty, forty - from all directions. One hundred, two hundred, I lost count; now too dark to see ...

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A Song for May

The Hawthorn (or May Tree) by Margaret W. Tarrant (1888-1959)

Originally posted 2018-05-06 05:20:59.

A Song for May - This post is a mashup of anecdote, memoir, and selected prose from Richard Jefferies and W H Hudson, illustrated with seasonal atmospheric soundscapes. Join me for a day, if you will in a celebration of nature’s symphony ...

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Signs of Spring

Originally posted 2018-03-13 17:40:18.

SIGNS OF SPRING
Rebecca Welshman

Jefferies’ field notebooks are full of references to the passing seasons. Each year he carefully noted the first signs of spring and summer and found happiness in the visible tokens of the seasons as they returned.  As he wrote in The Open Air “I knew the very dates of them all—the reddening elm, the arum, the hawthorn leaf, the celandine, the may; the yellow iris of the waters, the heath of the hillside. The time of the nightingale—the place to hear the first note.”

via Signs of Spring